Melanoma Research Review [June]

This issue leads with two retrospective studies of PD-1 inhibitor therapy in patients with advanced melanoma and pre-existing autoimmunity or ipilimumab-triggered autoimmunity. Response rates were above 30% and unrelated to immune-related adverse events. The researchers also found anti-PD-1 induced quite frequent immune toxicities, but these were often mild and did not require discontinuation of therapy. A pooled analysis assessing the safety profile of nivolumab monotherapy for advanced melanoma concluded treatment-related side effects (most commonly fatigue, pruritus, diarrhea, and rash) were mostly low grade, and most resolved. Another study reports the results of the secondary endpoint – health-related quality of life – of a phase three trial with adjuvant ipilimumab versus placebo after complete resection of high-risk stage three melanoma. No differences in global health status scores between groups were observed during or after induction.

A number of articles focus on melanoma detection. A 31-gene expression pro le provides valuable prognostic information and improves identification of high-risk melanomas when used together with the AJCC online prediction tool. Another study shows the importance of performing an intra-patient comparative analysis using the ugly duckling sign, as it may reduce up to seven times the number of benign nevi excised when compared to a lesion-focused analysis only.

Featured in this issue:

  • Anti-PD-1 therapy in advanced melanoma and pre-existing autoimmunity or ipilimumab-triggered autoimmunity: A German study
  • Anti-PD-1 therapy in advanced melanoma and pre-existing autoimmune disorders or major toxicity with ipilimumab: An international study
  • Safety profile of nivolumab monotherapy for advanced melanoma
  • High-dose interferon-α-2b in stage T2bNO, T3a-bNO, T4a-bNO, and T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic) melanoma
  • HRQoL with adjuvant ipilimumab vs placebo after complete resection of high-risk stage III melanoma
  • Clinical course and patterns of metastases of mucosal melanomas
  • Tumour thickness and mitotic rate predict OS in patients with PVM
  • GEP improves dentification of high-risk cutaneous melanoma tumours
  • UDN as a major factor of efficiency in melanoma detection
  • EIS in short-term digital dermoscopy imaging of melanocytic lesions

Click here to download the full paper


Learn more about skin cancer medicine in primary care at the next Skin Cancer Certificate Courses:

Skin Cancer Certificate Courses in Australia

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *