Research Review on Melanoma [February]

The February melanoma research review addresses a range of topics including melanoma surveillance, early detection, diagnostic risk factors, and predicting treatment outcomes. The leading article reports surveillance through a specialised clinic as a cost-effective strategy for the management of individuals at high risk of melanoma. Another study assessing patient-performed mobile teledermoscopy for the early detection of melanoma found favourable consumer acceptance.

A paper investigating prognostic impact of lymphovascular invasion in cutaneous melanoma showed lymphovascular invasion has signi cant prognostic impact on nodal involvement, recurrence, and overall survival in cutaneous melanoma. A small study assessing cessation of targeted therapy after a complete response in BRAF-mutant advanced melanoma reports the majority of these patients will relapse. What remains unclear is whether different treatment durations and dosages may be appropriate in these patients providing a more patient-tailored approach.

The concluding papers in this issue include an assessment of a psychoeducational intervention to reduce fear of cancer recurrence. The authors report the intervention was effective in reducing stress and increasing melanoma-related knowledge in people at high risk for another melanoma. A survey of complementary and alternative medicine in melanoma patients found nearly half of the 1089 participants used these medicines and highlighted communication on complementary and alternative medicine should become a regular topic in counselling melanoma patients.

Featured in this issue:

  • Cost-effectiveness of skin surveillance through a specialised high risk melanoma clinic
  • Clinical features associated with higher risk of melanoma
  • Consumer acceptance of patient-performed mobile teledermoscopy
  • A gene signature to differentiate melanoma from benign nevi
  • Prognostic impact of lymphovascular invasion in cutaneous melanoma
  • Factors predictive of outcome after dabrafenib and trametinib treatment
  • Cessation of targeted therapy after a complete response in BRAF-mutant advanced melanoma
  • 3DCRT vs IMRT after therapeutic groin lymphadenectomy for patients with melanoma
  • Outcomes in MBM patients treated with SRS and various systemic immunologic and targeted melanoma agents
  • Psychoeducational intervention to reduce fear of cancer recurrence
  • Use of complementary and alternative medicine in melanoma patients

Click here to download the full paper


Learn more about skin cancer medicine in primary care at the next Skin Cancer Certificate Courses:

Skin Cancer Certificate Courses in Australia

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