Case discussion: How would you treat this patient? [14 August]

This week we have a great case from Dr Alzubidy. This is one of those spot diagnoses – dead easy when you know what it is; impossible when you don’t! So, this is one of those appearances that you just need to memorise.

This is on the breast of a young woman, and has been present since childhood. What is the diagnosis?

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Case submitted by Dr Hind Alzubaidy

Please share your thoughts in the comment section below. Professor David Wilkinson will provide his opinion and advice.


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9 comments on “Case discussion: How would you treat this patient? [14 August]

  1. Chaos with two shades of colour and patchy dark black blotches and brown networks. We need to know if its a new thing and warrant to excise it.However if its long term lesion, maybe short term monitoring.

    1. I was not sure the diagnoses I thought that could be melanoma. Has silver has scatared spot with blue color

  2. Present since childhood- congenital agminated naevus. A cluster group of melanocytic nevi confined to a local area
    Naevus spills you would expect the lesions on a lighter brown background. There is some patchy background pigmentation but I will stick toy original diagnosis

  3. Congenital naevus. Dermoscopic features does not seem to reveal any significant pathology.
    I will prefer to place it under 6-12 monthly surveillance

  4. Looks like a Congenital Naevus. If there are no recent changes to the lesion, I will offer close monitoing surveillance 3-6 months

  5. This is Nevus spillus – a congenital type nevus. Very similar to David’s agminated nevus, and I am certainly not smart enough to know how different they really are. Important, benign, no increased risk of melanoma (that is, no more than any other nevus) and no need for monitoring. One to store in the memory banks!