A Quarter of Australians Photograph Their Moles

photograph

Almost a quarter of Australians photograph their skin to keep track of moles, with an estimated 100 million potentially life-saving images taken every year, according to recent research.

The skin checking app Miiskin conducted a nationally representative survey of 1,003 Australian adults. It found that 24 per cent of Australians have taken photos of their lesions to track suspicious changes.

Further, nearly a third of 25-34-year-olds photograph their skin at least once a month. Continue reading “A Quarter of Australians Photograph Their Moles”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [February 2018]

skin cancer update

In this month’s skin cancer update, Associate Professor Guiseppe Argenziano explains some important rules to avoid missing a melanoma. Giuseppe says it is possible for any doctor to miss a melanoma, but there are a set of rules we can apply to every scenario to decrease the likelihood of this happening.

Guiseppe gives the example of two patients whose moles looked dermoscopically similar, yet one lesion was benign and the other was a melanoma. How can doctors avoid making the wrong decision in a case like this?

Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [February 2018]”

Biopsy Margin for Total Removal of Dysplastic Nevi

dysplastic nevi

Complete removal of individual dysplastic nevi is often achieved by a second surgical procedure after the initial biopsy. The choice to perform the second procedure is strongly influenced by the histopathologic margins of the initial biopsy specimen.

A study recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology evaluated the clinical and histopathologic outcomes of total biopsy of dysplastic nevi using a pre-determined margin of normal skin. Continue reading “Biopsy Margin for Total Removal of Dysplastic Nevi”

Declining Risk of Skin Cancer After Organ Transplantation

computer vision

Is the high risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma after organ transplantation declining? A recent study looked at the temporal trends for the risk of skin cancer – particularly squamous cell carcinoma – after organ transplantation.

The high risk of skin cancer after organ transplantation is a major, well-documented clinical challenge, but there are few reports on temporal trends in the risk of post-transplant cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Continue reading “Declining Risk of Skin Cancer After Organ Transplantation”

Female Night Shift Workers Have Increased Cancer Risk

night shift workers

An analysis of cancer risks has found a significant increase in the risk of skin, breast and gastrointestinal cancer in women who work night shifts over a long period of time. A study published in the Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention journal found that the cancer risk of night shift workers increased by 19 percent overall.

Women who worked night shifts over a long period of time had a 32 percent increased risk of breast cancer and an 18 percent increased risk of gastrointestinal cancer. Continue reading “Female Night Shift Workers Have Increased Cancer Risk”

Outdoor Workers at High Risk of Skin Cancer

outdoor workers

More than two million outdoor workers are not being provided with any sun protection by their employers, according to the 2017 Skin Health Australia Report Card.

In a national population survey, 45 percent of respondents were required to work outdoors sometimes, regularly or all the time. Fifty-seven percent of these people said their employers did not supply sunscreen, while 66 percent did not supply protective clothing and 80 percent did not supply sunglasses. Continue reading “Outdoor Workers at High Risk of Skin Cancer”

HealthCert Recommends: The IDS 5th World Congress of Dermoscopy

World Congress of Dermoscopy

If you have an interest in dermoscopy and skin cancer medicine, don’t miss the International Dermoscopy Society’s 5th World Congress of Dermoscopy, to be held in Thessaloniki, Greece from 14 to 16 June 2018.

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The Congress will bring together passionate dermoscopists from around the globe, from novice researchers to experienced clinicians. It offers a great opportunity for medical professionals interested in skin cancer to learn about the latest research in dermoscopy from inspirational thought leaders in the field. Continue reading “HealthCert Recommends: The IDS 5th World Congress of Dermoscopy”

Do skin cancers on elderly patients always need to be treated?

elderly patients

In very elderly patients, less aggressive skin cancers on the faces might not always need to be treated, according to a study in the US. Research suggests that the age and relative lifespan of the patient should be taken into consideration when deliberating treatment for slow-growing non-melanoma skin cancer on the face.

In a study published in JAMA Surgery, researchers said that there are multiple ways to treat non-melanoma skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and that the decision to treat them should take into account the patient’s lifestyle, needs and wishes. Researchers also advised that patients need to understand what the course of the cancer usually is. Continue reading “Do skin cancers on elderly patients always need to be treated?”

How does early life sun exposure affect skin cancer risk?

risk

How does sun exposure in early life affect risk of developing basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas?

Sun exposure is the main cause of basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas, although pattern and amount differ by cancer type. Sun sensitivity is the major risk factor.

A study published in the Photochemistry and Photobiology journal investigated the risk factors and residential ambient UV in a population-based sample of Australians. The cohort included 916 basal cell carcinomas, 433 squamous cell carcinomas, and 1,224 controls. Continue reading “How does early life sun exposure affect skin cancer risk?”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [January 2018]

Skin Cancer Update

A multi-centre study has explored the prevalence of melanoma on hairy scalps in comparison to bald scalps. Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano explains in this skin cancer update video that – while around 76 percent of scalp melanomas are found on people with thinning or no hair – a quarter appear on people with hairy scalps.

Scalp melanoma can be aggressive and has a poorer prognosis compared to melanoma found elsewhere on the body, because scalp melanoma is generally thicker at the time of diagnosis. It also looks different depending on where it is located on the scalp itself, making it trickier to identify. Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [January 2018]”