Mortality in Patients with Basal and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

mortality

There are varying reports of the association of basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with mortality. A recent review looked at the all-cause mortality of the general population after a diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma.

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Most Effective Treatment for Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma

superficial basal cell carcinoma

A variety of non-invasive treatments are available in the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma. A study looked at three different methods to determine the most effective approach after one, three and five years: photodynamic therapy, topical imiquimod or topical 5-fluorouracil. Continue reading “Most Effective Treatment for Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma”

Skin Cancer Update with Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [April 2018]

skin cancer update APR18

In this month’s skin cancer update, Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses melanoma that arise within pre-existing congenital naevi.

The risk of melanoma arising out of large congenital naevi in a person’s lifetime is 1 in 10. The risk in intermediate congenital naevi is 1 in 200 and the risk in small congenital naevi is 1 in 200,000. Thus, the risk increases with the size of the naevus. Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [April 2018]”

How can computer vision aid in melanoma detection?

computer vision

How can computer vision aid in melanoma detection? A study recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology compared the diagnostic accuracy of computer algorithms to dermatologists using dermoscopic images.

The study involved 100 randomly selected dermoscopic images comprising of 50 melanomas, 44 naevi, and six lentigines. Researchers used both non-learned and machine learning methods to combine individual automated predictions into “fusion” algorithms. In a companion study, eight dermatologists classified the lesions in the 100 images as either benign or malignant. Continue reading “How can computer vision aid in melanoma detection?”

A New Way to Evaluate Acral Lesions

lesions

This month’s article is an editorial in the British Journal of Dermatology by Tschandl and Wiesner, that explores recent advances in aspects of imaging of pigmented skin lesions.

It is a quick, worthwhile read to consider recent developments. My primary reason for highlighting this article this month, however, is because it includes work by Lallas et al mentioning a new way to evaluate acral lesions. Continue reading “A New Way to Evaluate Acral Lesions”

Case discussion: How would you treat this patient? [12 March]

Case discussion

This week we have an interesting case from Dr David Stewart. An 52-year-old male, renal transplant patient presents with a lesion on his Right ear.

Please review and describe the clinical and dermoscopic image. What is your evaluation, and proposed next step/s?

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Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [March 2018]

skin cancer update

In this month’s skin cancer update, Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses vulvar mucosal lesions. These pigmented lesions can be difficult to manage because they often look very irregular and fit the ABCD criteria for melanoma.

Giuseppe explains that with vulvar lesions, we should avoid applying the same rules that typically apply to the rest of the body concerning the clinical diagnosis of melanomas. Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [March 2018]”

How is artificial intelligence changing skin cancer medicine?

artificial intelligence

Our article of interest this month is a paper that I urge everyone to read and think about carefully. Abbott and Smith explore key issues about rapidly developing artificial intelligence technology and its likely / possible application and use in skin cancer medicine, both by patients and clinicians. Continue reading “How is artificial intelligence changing skin cancer medicine?”

A Quarter of Australians Photograph Their Moles

photograph

Almost a quarter of Australians photograph their skin to keep track of moles, with an estimated 100 million potentially life-saving images taken every year, according to recent research.

The skin checking app Miiskin conducted a nationally representative survey of 1,003 Australian adults. It found that 24 per cent of Australians have taken photos of their lesions to track suspicious changes.

Further, nearly a third of 25-34-year-olds photograph their skin at least once a month. Continue reading “A Quarter of Australians Photograph Their Moles”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [February 2018]

skin cancer update

In this month’s skin cancer update, Associate Professor Guiseppe Argenziano explains some important rules to avoid missing a melanoma. Giuseppe says it is possible for any doctor to miss a melanoma, but there are a set of rules we can apply to every scenario to decrease the likelihood of this happening.

Guiseppe gives the example of two patients whose moles looked dermoscopically similar, yet one lesion was benign and the other was a melanoma. How can doctors avoid making the wrong decision in a case like this?

Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [February 2018]”