Biopsy Margin for Total Removal of Dysplastic Nevi

dysplastic nevi

Complete removal of individual dysplastic nevi is often achieved by a second surgical procedure after the initial biopsy. The choice to perform the second procedure is strongly influenced by the histopathologic margins of the initial biopsy specimen.

A study recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology evaluated the clinical and histopathologic outcomes of total biopsy of dysplastic nevi using a pre-determined margin of normal skin. Continue reading “Biopsy Margin for Total Removal of Dysplastic Nevi”

Do skin cancers on elderly patients always need to be treated?

elderly patients

In very elderly patients, less aggressive skin cancers on the faces might not always need to be treated, according to a study in the US. Research suggests that the age and relative lifespan of the patient should be taken into consideration when deliberating treatment for slow-growing non-melanoma skin cancer on the face.

In a study published in JAMA Surgery, researchers said that there are multiple ways to treat non-melanoma skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and that the decision to treat them should take into account the patient’s lifestyle, needs and wishes. Researchers also advised that patients need to understand what the course of the cancer usually is. Continue reading “Do skin cancers on elderly patients always need to be treated?”

Proportion of Melanomas Managed by GPs in Australia

dysplastic nevi

This month, we have a really interesting and relevant research letter to review and consider, concerning the proportion of melanomas managed by GPs in Australia. This was published in the Australasian Journal of Dermatology by Wu et al. I noted it in part because it referenced some research that I did a decade ago (how time flies)! The authors used Medicare billing data to look at trends in melanoma excision over time across Australia. Continue reading “Proportion of Melanomas Managed by GPs in Australia”

Suturing Technique for Best Cosmetic Outcomes

sunscreen

How does suturing technique affect cosmetic outcomes after facial surgery? Recent research published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology sought to compare the cosmetic results of simple interrupted sutures versus running subcuticular sutures in facial surgery.

In a controlled trial, adults receiving dermatologic surgery on the face (for conditions such as skin cancer) were randomised to receive either simple interrupted sutures (73 patients) or running subcuticular sutures (69 patients). Continue reading “Suturing Technique for Best Cosmetic Outcomes”

Recommended Minimum Surgical Margin to Remove Skin Cancer

dysplastic nevi

A surgical margin of at least two millimetres around a cancerous skin lesion is the minimum requirement to ensure total removal of cancer cells and to avoid the need for further surgeries, according to a study by researchers at Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone Health.

The results of a study enlisting 138 skin cancer patients was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, and found that excising a two millimetre margin beyond the edges of a suspicious mole was best practice for complete removal.

Continue reading “Recommended Minimum Surgical Margin to Remove Skin Cancer”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [October]

skin cancer update

In this skin cancer update video, Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses the revolutionary results of a study comparing lymph-node dissection with observation in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. Of patients who had a positive sentinel-node biopsy, the study compared the outcomes of patients who underwent complete lymph-node dissection with the outcomes of patients who were just observed after a positive sentinel-node biopsy and did not undergo a dissection.

Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [October]”

A Quick Guide to Pivotal Flaps [Part 1]

Pivotal flaps can be a preferable excision method for lesions which can’t be excised using an ellipse. However this method requires a great degree of planning as considerable tension may be present and extensive undermining needed to close the excision without tension. In the short video below (Part I), surgical lecturer Tony Dicker demonstrates how to plan and perform a pivotal flap with optimal outcomes. This is a video sample from the Professional Certificate of Skin Cancer SurgeryContinue reading “A Quick Guide to Pivotal Flaps [Part 1]”

[Review] Skin Cancer Summit and Masterclasses 2017

Skin Cancer Summit

Skin Cancer Summit & Masterclasses

26 – 29 July 2017, Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre

The 9th Skin Cancer Summit and Masterclasses saw international thought leaders in skin cancer medicine converge in Brisbane to collaborate with GPs from across Australia.

Continue reading “[Review] Skin Cancer Summit and Masterclasses 2017”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [August]

Skin Cancer Update

A multi-centre study has explored the prevalence of melanoma on hairy scalps in comparison to bald scalps. Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano explains in this skin cancer update video that – while around 76 percent of scalp melanomas are found on people with thinning or no hair – a quarter appear on people with hairy scalps.

Scalp melanoma can be aggressive and has a poorer prognosis compared to melanoma found elsewhere on the body, because scalp melanoma is generally thicker at the time of diagnosis. It also looks different depending on where it is located on the scalp itself, making it trickier to identify. Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [August]”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [July]

Skin Cancer Update

In this skin cancer update video, Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses a study by the International Dermoscopy Society that sheds light on melanoma under the fingernail. He explains the causes of nail pigmentation and what criteria are used for diagnosing such irregularities as melanoma.

Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [July]”