Mortality in Patients with Basal and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

mortality

There are varying reports of the association of basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma with mortality. A recent review looked at the all-cause mortality of the general population after a diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma.

Continue reading “Mortality in Patients with Basal and Squamous Cell Carcinoma”

Most Effective Treatment for Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma

superficial basal cell carcinoma

A variety of non-invasive treatments are available in the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma. A study looked at three different methods to determine the most effective approach after one, three and five years: photodynamic therapy, topical imiquimod or topical 5-fluorouracil. Continue reading “Most Effective Treatment for Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma”

Can a course of fluorouracil cream reduce a person’s risk of BCC and SCC?

fluorouracil

This month’s paper from JAMA Dermatology, by Weinstock et al, is instructive. The authors did a randomised trial of five per cent fluorouracil cream applied to the face, to see if a two to four week application would reduce the number of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in the following year. Continue reading “Can a course of fluorouracil cream reduce a person’s risk of BCC and SCC?”

Gefitinib for Incurable, Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma

gefitinib

A recent study looked at the efficacy of gefitinib in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) whose cancer was not amenable to curative therapy including surgery or radiation.

The epidermal growth factor receptor plays a key role in the carcinogenesis of SCC. However, there are limited data on the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in incurable, recurrent and/or metastatic SCC. Continue reading “Gefitinib for Incurable, Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [March 2018]

skin cancer update

In this month’s skin cancer update, Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses vulvar mucosal lesions. These pigmented lesions can be difficult to manage because they often look very irregular and fit the ABCD criteria for melanoma.

Giuseppe explains that with vulvar lesions, we should avoid applying the same rules that typically apply to the rest of the body concerning the clinical diagnosis of melanomas. Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [March 2018]”

Case discussion: How would you treat this patient? [26 February]

Case discussion

This week we have an engaging case from Dr Tim Aung. An 80-year-old male with past history of melanoma and NMSC. The below shown lesion was noted on regular skin check. 

Please review and describe the clinical and dermoscopic image. What is your evaluation, and proposed next step/s? Continue reading “Case discussion: How would you treat this patient? [26 February]”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [February 2018]

skin cancer update

In this month’s skin cancer update, Associate Professor Guiseppe Argenziano explains some important rules to avoid missing a melanoma. Giuseppe says it is possible for any doctor to miss a melanoma, but there are a set of rules we can apply to every scenario to decrease the likelihood of this happening.

Guiseppe gives the example of two patients whose moles looked dermoscopically similar, yet one lesion was benign and the other was a melanoma. How can doctors avoid making the wrong decision in a case like this?

Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [February 2018]”

Female Night Shift Workers Have Increased Cancer Risk

night shift workers

An analysis of cancer risks has found a significant increase in the risk of skin, breast and gastrointestinal cancer in women who work night shifts over a long period of time. A study published in the Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention journal found that the cancer risk of night shift workers increased by 19 percent overall.

Women who worked night shifts over a long period of time had a 32 percent increased risk of breast cancer and an 18 percent increased risk of gastrointestinal cancer. Continue reading “Female Night Shift Workers Have Increased Cancer Risk”

HealthCert Recommends: The IDS 5th World Congress of Dermoscopy

World Congress of Dermoscopy

If you have an interest in dermoscopy and skin cancer medicine, don’t miss the International Dermoscopy Society’s 5th World Congress of Dermoscopy, to be held in Thessaloniki, Greece from 14 to 16 June 2018.

REGISTER NOW

The Congress will bring together passionate dermoscopists from around the globe, from novice researchers to experienced clinicians. It offers a great opportunity for medical professionals interested in skin cancer to learn about the latest research in dermoscopy from inspirational thought leaders in the field. Continue reading “HealthCert Recommends: The IDS 5th World Congress of Dermoscopy”

Do skin cancers on elderly patients always need to be treated?

elderly patients

In very elderly patients, less aggressive skin cancers on the faces might not always need to be treated, according to a study in the US. Research suggests that the age and relative lifespan of the patient should be taken into consideration when deliberating treatment for slow-growing non-melanoma skin cancer on the face.

In a study published in JAMA Surgery, researchers said that there are multiple ways to treat non-melanoma skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and that the decision to treat them should take into account the patient’s lifestyle, needs and wishes. Researchers also advised that patients need to understand what the course of the cancer usually is. Continue reading “Do skin cancers on elderly patients always need to be treated?”