Dermoscopy in the Diagnosis of Melanoma In Situ

dermoscopy

This month, we look at the value of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of melanoma in situ. We all know how valuable dermoscopy is in increasing our diagnostic accuracy. Dermoscopy allows us to see more details in the skin lesions of our patients, giving us more information, and hence providing more data for diagnosis. Continue reading “Dermoscopy in the Diagnosis of Melanoma In Situ”

Skin Cancer Update with Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [May 2018]

skin cancer update MAY18

Professor Giuseppe Argenziano provides a skin cancer update this month that focuses on melanoma in children.

Paediatric melanomas are quite rare, but Giuseppe discusses the interesting findings of a study (which he co-authored) that found that 70 per cent of paediatric melanomas arise in association with an existing congenital melanocytic naevi. Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [May 2018]”

Skin Cancer Update with Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [April 2018]

skin cancer update APR18

In this month’s skin cancer update, Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses melanoma that arise within pre-existing congenital naevi.

The risk of melanoma arising out of large congenital naevi in a person’s lifetime is 1 in 10. The risk in intermediate congenital naevi is 1 in 200 and the risk in small congenital naevi is 1 in 200,000. Thus, the risk increases with the size of the naevus. Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [April 2018]”

How can computer vision aid in melanoma detection?

computer vision

How can computer vision aid in melanoma detection? A study recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology compared the diagnostic accuracy of computer algorithms to dermatologists using dermoscopic images.

The study involved 100 randomly selected dermoscopic images comprising of 50 melanomas, 44 naevi, and six lentigines. Researchers used both non-learned and machine learning methods to combine individual automated predictions into “fusion” algorithms. In a companion study, eight dermatologists classified the lesions in the 100 images as either benign or malignant. Continue reading “How can computer vision aid in melanoma detection?”

A New Way to Evaluate Acral Lesions

lesions

This month’s article is an editorial in the British Journal of Dermatology by Tschandl and Wiesner, that explores recent advances in aspects of imaging of pigmented skin lesions.

It is a quick, worthwhile read to consider recent developments. My primary reason for highlighting this article this month, however, is because it includes work by Lallas et al mentioning a new way to evaluate acral lesions. Continue reading “A New Way to Evaluate Acral Lesions”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [March 2018]

skin cancer update

In this month’s skin cancer update, Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses vulvar mucosal lesions. These pigmented lesions can be difficult to manage because they often look very irregular and fit the ABCD criteria for melanoma.

Giuseppe explains that with vulvar lesions, we should avoid applying the same rules that typically apply to the rest of the body concerning the clinical diagnosis of melanomas. Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [March 2018]”

How is artificial intelligence changing skin cancer medicine?

artificial intelligence

Our article of interest this month is a paper that I urge everyone to read and think about carefully. Abbott and Smith explore key issues about rapidly developing artificial intelligence technology and its likely / possible application and use in skin cancer medicine, both by patients and clinicians. Continue reading “How is artificial intelligence changing skin cancer medicine?”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [February 2018]

skin cancer update

In this month’s skin cancer update, Associate Professor Guiseppe Argenziano explains some important rules to avoid missing a melanoma. Giuseppe says it is possible for any doctor to miss a melanoma, but there are a set of rules we can apply to every scenario to decrease the likelihood of this happening.

Guiseppe gives the example of two patients whose moles looked dermoscopically similar, yet one lesion was benign and the other was a melanoma. How can doctors avoid making the wrong decision in a case like this?

Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [February 2018]”

HealthCert Recommends: The IDS 5th World Congress of Dermoscopy

World Congress of Dermoscopy

If you have an interest in dermoscopy and skin cancer medicine, don’t miss the International Dermoscopy Society’s 5th World Congress of Dermoscopy, to be held in Thessaloniki, Greece from 14 to 16 June 2018.

REGISTER NOW

The Congress will bring together passionate dermoscopists from around the globe, from novice researchers to experienced clinicians. It offers a great opportunity for medical professionals interested in skin cancer to learn about the latest research in dermoscopy from inspirational thought leaders in the field. Continue reading “HealthCert Recommends: The IDS 5th World Congress of Dermoscopy”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [December]

skin cancer update

In our last skin cancer update video for 2017, Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses the process of monitoring patients with multiple nevi, and how melanoma comes to be diagnosed in these patients.

Around 10 percent of melanomas diagnosed today have been monitored over time in patients with multiple nevi. Practitioners often ask whether a side-by-side comparison is needed in patients with multiple nevi in order to assess changes, or whether the lesions develop to fit specific melanoma criteria over time and can therefore be diagnosed without a side-by-side comparison. Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [December]”